Open-uri20141002-2-1eho4u6_thumb

Nicole Serratore

Arts, Culture, and Travel Journalism

NEW YORK, NY

Nicole Serratore

I write about US and UK theater and my travels to and fro.

Featured

Open-uri20170620-4-1pqqfrp_profile

James Comey and the Predator in Chief

As I listened to James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, tell the Senate Intelligence Committee about his personal meetings and phone calls with President Trump, I was reminded of something: the experience of a woman being harassed by her powerful, predatory boss. There was precisely that sinister air of coercion, of an employee helpless to avoid unsavory contact with an employer who is trying to grab what he wants.
The New York Times Link to Story
Open-uri20180816-4-3w4b2v_profile

Egg review at Summerhall, Edinburgh – ‘exuberant aerial work’

Marrying aerial movement to the process of egg donation may not be the most obvious of creative choices, but the physical risks and emotional leaps of faith in that act become centered through this expressive form. Egg mixes the clinical with the personal for something that is both informative and gripping.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180815-4-1sy74tq_profile

Edinburgh Review: One Life Stand at Summerhall

With the glow of phone screens and the plink of notifications, Eve Nicol’s One Life Stand is about contemporary intimacy in our screen-centric age. Her thrilling three-character gig theatre piece looks at the challenges of speaking honestly with those closest to you while finding temporary solace in strangers.
Exeunt Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180814-4-k5ed7i_profile

Trump Lear review at Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh – ‘Strange, amusing blend of Shakespeare and Donald Trump’

David Carl and Michole Biancosino’s Trump Lear manages to be both a fair rendering of an abridged production of Shakespeare’s Lear and an astute imagined conflict with the 45th president. Far from a gimmick, the meta-commentary of the show argues that Trump is poisoning comedy and art just as he does this show.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180813-4-1tn5wfr_profile

Edinburgh review: Angry Alan at Underbelly

In Penelope Skinner’s play Angry Alan, it feels liberating and a little naughty to laugh in the lead character Roger’s face. Roger (Donald Sage Mackay) is a newbie to the Men’s Rights Movement and he’s found answers to all his problems through very “serious” YouTube videos that expose the “truth” (the play allegedly uses real clips).
Exeunt Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180813-4-1g68w3p_profile

Heroine review at Assembly Hall, Edinburgh – ‘eye-opening story of a soldier’s sexual assault’

Sexual violence in the US military is all too frequent, under-reported, and rarely prosecuted. Writer-performer Mary Jane Wells’ one-woman show Heroine recounts some of the real-life experiences of an American sergeant who was gang raped by men in her unit and then sent into combat alongside her attackers.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180813-4-5j9xl6_profile

Re: Production review at Zoo Southside, Edinburgh – ‘smart look at career and family challenges’

What happens when a couple is in love and want to spend the rest of their lives together, but the question of starting a family starts to divide them? In Re: Production, playwright Jenna May Hobbs and director Suzanna Ward approach this serious issue in a playful manner – with music, dancing and light audience interaction – shading out the complexities of modern parenthood for heterosexual couples today.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180813-4-18tmj0a_profile

Not Yet Suffragette review at Underbelly, Edinburgh – ‘sluggish and inconsistent feminist comedy’

Somewhere between lecture, cabaret and stand-up, Natalie Cutler’s one-woman show Not Yet Suffragette gives a history lesson on women’s rights, battles and issues. But the show’s low energy and reedy laughs need work, as Cutler’s salient points are sometimes lost. She then shifts gears to figure out sarcastically what is even left for women to fight for in the 21st century since we have it all.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180810-4-1r5znks_profile

Edinburgh Review: Ulster American at Traverse Theatre

Playwright David Ireland wants to provoke in his new play Ulster American. In satirizing uptight Brits, ridiculous Hollywood actors, compromising sycophants, and the all-too-flexible politics of artists in the face of their ambition, he wants to push as many buttons as he can. His approach is all so wild it beggars belief which should allow for an audience to revel in the darkest of comedy.
Exeunt Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180810-4-1acy2gf_profile

Vessel review at Underbelly, Edinburgh – ‘thoughtful exploration of abortion in Ireland’

Abortion in Ireland is a knotty subject. Laura Wyatt O’Keeffe’s play Vessel attempts to untangle some of that complexity. With careful, fine detail, she peels apart family shame, personal freedom, societal privilege and the financial and human cost of the restrictive antiabortion laws leading up to the repeal of the 8th amendment.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180810-4-15k1gtv_profile

Our Country review at Summerhall, Edinburgh – ‘complex story of a tangled brother-sister relationship’

Siblings share so much – whether it’s their make-believe games, whispered stories or their own brand of rough-housing. In Annie Saunders’ and Becca Wolff’s dance-heavy theatre piece, Our Country, these kinds of interactions are used to tell a complex story of a tangled brother-sister relationship – one that is not easy to hold on to and impossible to let go of.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20180809-4-14yfu9h_profile

Kit Finnie: Mabel and Mickey review at Underbelly Cowgate, Edinburgh – ‘intriguing but inconsistent’

Writer-performer Kit Finnie explores the fascinating, tragic experiences of scandal-plagued Hollywood silent film star, Mabel Normand in Kit Finnie: Mabel and Mickey. Finnie moves between identities – sometimes she’s Normand, sometimes herself. But as Finnie and the show intentionally break down, the clarity of Finnie’s message about the perils of performance does not always come through.
The Stage Link to Story

About

Nicole Serratore

Nicole Serratore is a New York City-based freelance journalist.

She has written opinion pieces, reviews, and features for the New York Times, American Theatre magazine, Variety, The Stage (UK), the Village Voice, Exeunt magazine, TDF Stages, Flavorpill, and The Craptacular.

She is the Broadway editor at Exeunt NYC, the New York portal for Exeunt magazine. She is a current member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Drama Desk, and the Outer Critics Circle.

She was a co-host and co-producer of the Maxamoo theater podcast. She was a Fellow at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center's National Critics Institute in 2015.

She has written about travel and world adventures for Shermans Travel and Frommers.com.

She has a B.F.A. in Film and Television from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. She has a J.D. from Fordham University. She is a former film executive and producer. She once had a prize-winning cow.