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Nicole Serratore

Arts, Culture, and Travel Journalism

NEW YORK, NY

Nicole Serratore

I write about US and UK theater and my travels to and fro.

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James Comey and the Predator in Chief

As I listened to James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, tell the Senate Intelligence Committee about his personal meetings and phone calls with President Trump, I was reminded of something: the experience of a woman being harassed by her powerful, predatory boss. There was precisely that sinister air of coercion, of an employee helpless to avoid unsavory contact with an employer who is trying to grab what he wants.
The New York Times Link to Story
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Clubbed Thumb: The East Village theatre company giving writers a launchpad to Broadway

The Off-Off-Broadway theatre has provided a testing ground for a string of plays that have hit the Great White Way. Artistic director Maria Striar tells Nicole Serratore why choosing ‘funny, strange and provocative’ work is the key. Two years ago, the Tony-nominated play What the Constitution Means to Me was playing at an 89-seat theatre in the East Village.
The Stage Link to Story
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Happy Talk review at Pershing Square Signature Center, New York – ‘an awkward mixture of comedy and sincerity’

When Susan Sarandon finally ceases her persistent upbeat chatter in Jesse Eisenberg’s new play Happy Talk, the resulting awkward silence does not feel wholly intentional. Eisenberg’s play provides a gruelling obstacle course for director Scott Elliott. Via a series of hairpin turns, it veers from cringe comedy to family drama and back again until the production eventually flies off course.
The Stage Link to Story
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Nicole Serratore: My top 5 supporting actors tipped for glory at Tony Awards 2019

With Tony nominations out this week, there’s an abundance of talent to celebrate. But this year, rather than the attention being drawn by leading actors or celebrity names, there are a number of featured actor nominees whose performances shone out. Nicole Serratore picks out the scene stealing support acts from last season.
The Stage Link to Story
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Review: Estado Vegetal at BAC

Nicole Serratore and her succulent plant, Phyl, sit down to discuss Estado Vegetal by Chilean artist Manuela Infante. It’s a work that is meant to explore communication between humans and plants and consider theater from a post-anthropocentric point of view. Nicole: What’s it like to finally see a show that tries to decenter a human perspective and express a plant one?
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
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Review: Self-Injurious Behavior | Alamo Manhattan Productions | The 30th Street Theatre

Jessica Cavangh's Self-Injurious Behavior premieres in New York; we have a review of the off-Broadway production. Parents can be haunted by the choices they make for their children. It can be a cycle of fear, guilt, and self-recrimination. Did I do my best? Did I screw my kid up? Did I hurt them?
Theater Jones Link to Story
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Beetlejuice review at the Winter Garden, New York – ‘uneasy mixture of the mournful and macabre’

This new screen-to-stage musical adaptation of Tim Burton’s ghoulish 1988 film feels like two different musicals have been fused together. On one hand it’s trying to be a sincere exploration of loss and grief; on the other it’s a wacky netherworld comedy about a mouthy demon and his bag of tricks.
The Stage Link to Story
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Tootsie review at Marquis Theatre, New York – ‘superb performances, ho-hum score’

Despite a rather flavourless score by David Yazbek, the screen-to-stage adaptation of Tootsie, the film that scored Dustin Hoffman an Oscar nomination in 1983, is arguably the funniest new musical on Broadway. Director Scott Ellis’ production is first and foremost a comedy, though it’s also alert to contemporary gender politics.
The Stage Link to Story
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Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus review at Booth Theatre – ‘Taylor Mac’s laborious comedy’

Taylor Mac, the radically subversive theatre artist, and Nathan Lane, America’s stage comedy sweetheart, make an unlikely pairing. Lane is the star of Mac’s new play Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus. It’s been labelled a comedy, but it’s more of an experimental deconstruction of capitalism and political apathy.
The Stage Link to Story
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Burn This review at Hudson Theatre, New York – ‘a sublime performance from Adam Driver’

Adam Driver gives a sublimely physical performance in this Broadway revival of Lanford Wilson’s 1987 play. As a piece of writing Burn This is far better at character than it is at plot, but Driver makes it come alive, to the point that Michael Mayer’s bright production dims when he’s not on stage.
The Stage Link to Story
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King Lear starring Glenda Jackson review at Cort Theatre, New York – ‘a performance of quiet fury’

Despite being set in Shakespeare’s England, Gold’s production subtly invokes Trump’s America (and, perhaps too, a Brexit-addled UK) – a country sliding into self-interested chaos. Though Lear initiates it, soon the whole kingdom has degraded with him, with characters losing their minds to ambition, sexual desire, or succumbing to the leadership vacuum.
The Stage Link to Story
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What the Constitution Means to Me review at Helen Hayes Theater, New York – ‘personal, political, powerful’

Should the US constitution be abolished? Playwright and star Heidi Schreck debates this issue in her improbably funny and deeply felt play, What the Constitution Means to Me, channeling rage at America’s founding fathers and all they wrought. Referencing everything from Dirty Dancing to mail-order brides, the personable Schreck finds a unique way to pair constitutional history with an intensely personal family story about domestic violence, abortion, and resistance.
The Stage Link to Story

About

Nicole Serratore

Nicole Serratore is a New York City-based freelance journalist.

She has written opinion pieces, reviews, and features for the New York Times, American Theatre magazine, Variety, The Stage (UK), the Village Voice, Exeunt magazine, TDF Stages, Flavorpill, and The Craptacular.

She is the New York Managing Editor at Exeunt NYC, the New York portal for Exeunt magazine. She is a current member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Drama Desk, and the Outer Critics Circle.

She was a co-host and co-producer of the Maxamoo theater podcast. She was a Fellow at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center's National Critics Institute in 2015.

She has written about travel and world adventures for Shermans Travel and Frommers.com.

She has a B.F.A. in Film and Television from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. She has a J.D. from Fordham University. She is a former film executive and producer. She once had a prize-winning cow.