Open-uri20141002-2-1eho4u6_thumb

Nicole Serratore

Arts, Culture, and Travel Journalism

NEW YORK, NY

Nicole Serratore

I write about US and UK theater and my travels to and fro.

Featured

Open-uri20170620-4-1pqqfrp_profile

James Comey and the Predator in Chief

As I listened to James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, tell the Senate Intelligence Committee about his personal meetings and phone calls with President Trump, I was reminded of something: the experience of a woman being harassed by her powerful, predatory boss. There was precisely that sinister air of coercion, of an employee helpless to avoid unsavory contact with an employer who is trying to grab what he wants.
The New York Times Link to Story
Open-uri20190621-4-8fnpat_profile

Review: Toni Stone at Laura Pels Theatre

Like her subject, Lydia R. Diamond’s play Toni Stone refuses to hew to expectations. Toni is a fascinating character and you understand why someone would wish to dramatize her (this play is based on the book Curveball, The Remarkable Story of Toni Stone by Martha Ackmann). She is the first woman to play with a major league baseball team–the Indianapolis Clowns in the Negro League in the 1950s.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190617-4-1dle6cm_profile

Review: Series C Marathon of One Acts at Ensemble Studio Theatre

In an evening of shorts you never know what you might encounter. In the Ensemble Studio Theatre’s Series C Marathon of One-Acts not everything clicks all the time but it’s nice to get introduced to new writers, actors you are unfamiliar with, and plays that convert you into fans in an instant. Stephen Brown’s The Tourists is so perfectly balanced in writing, performance, and direction you might actually believe Paris awaits you just outside the boundaries of this set.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190614-4-1yk2g3s_profile

The Secret Life of Bees review at Linda Gross Theater, New York – ‘delicate and powerful’

Adapted from Sue Monk Kidd’s novel, The Secret Life of Bees is a coming-of-age story that portrays African-American faith and community with affecting emotional sweep.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20190614-4-y5vrpq_profile

Review: Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune at Broadhurst Theatre

Dating in the 1980s must have been a nightmare if plays like Lanford Wilson’s Burn This and Terrence McNally’s Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune are anything to go by. Were the male trains in Starlight Express also the worst? Did the female trains have to fall in love with the bottom of the train barrel lest living a single life: a fate worse than death?
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190605-4-h7mb35_profile

Review: Little Women at Primary Stages

A new interpretation of Little Women from Kate Hamill delivers a garbled message about identity and pursuing your dreams. Nicole Serratore reviews. When the best thing about a stage version of Little Women is the evil parrot, something has gone wrong. I understand the impetus to bring the novel’s characters to the stage—the strong sense of sisterhood, the affection for family, and the unusually proto-feminist character Jo March who is trying to find a place in society where she doesn’t quite fit in.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190528-4-1mw17sw_profile

Review: All My Sons at American Airlines Theatre

The performances still make Arthur Miller’s play rattle albeit in a pedestrian, literal production. Nicole Serratore reviews. Before I was born, my mother’s twin sister died. She was 19 at the time. It’s the kind of event that can change a family forever. Even though I came along years later, I felt its impact.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190528-4-1w1tuye_profile

Review: Feral at 59 E 59 Theater

Their hands tip their intention too soon. Rather than see their work as carefully structured narrative, it reads as bald manipulation. Edinburgh-based Tortoise in a Nutshell’s Feral is an award-winning puppet-driven piece that has been touring since 2013. But it suffers from this kind of controlling foreshadowing which is hard to ignore in an already slight 50-minute tale.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190520-4-t6gi1m_profile

Clubbed Thumb: The East Village theatre company giving writers a launchpad to Broadway

The Off-Off-Broadway theatre has provided a testing ground for a string of plays that have hit the Great White Way. Artistic director Maria Striar tells Nicole Serratore why choosing ‘funny, strange and provocative’ work is the key. Two years ago, the Tony-nominated play What the Constitution Means to Me was playing at an 89-seat theatre in the East Village.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20190528-4-18fxo8p_profile

Review: Ashita no Ma-Joe: Rocky Macbeth at Japan Society

When international theater comes to New York, it can offer a window into performance scenes from other countries and cultures. Genres and styles of storytelling can vary so greatly. It’s healthy to break up seeing a lot of American work with ideas and images from somewhere else. Then sometimes there is a man dressed as a giant fish flopping around on stage.
Exeunt NYC Link to Story
Open-uri20190517-4-1f44q05_profile

Happy Talk review at Pershing Square Signature Center, New York – ‘an awkward mixture of comedy and sincerity’

When Susan Sarandon finally ceases her persistent upbeat chatter in Jesse Eisenberg’s new play Happy Talk, the resulting awkward silence does not feel wholly intentional. Eisenberg’s play provides a gruelling obstacle course for director Scott Elliott. Via a series of hairpin turns, it veers from cringe comedy to family drama and back again until the production eventually flies off course.
The Stage Link to Story
Open-uri20190508-4-zb24or_profile

Nicole Serratore: My top 5 supporting actors tipped for glory at Tony Awards 2019

With Tony nominations out this week, there’s an abundance of talent to celebrate. But this year, rather than the attention being drawn by leading actors or celebrity names, there are a number of featured actor nominees whose performances shone out. Nicole Serratore picks out the scene stealing support acts from last season.
The Stage Link to Story

About

Nicole Serratore

Nicole Serratore is a New York City-based freelance journalist.

She has written opinion pieces, reviews, and features for the New York Times, American Theatre magazine, Variety, The Stage (UK), the Village Voice, Exeunt magazine, TDF Stages, Flavorpill, and The Craptacular.

She is the New York Managing Editor at Exeunt NYC, the New York portal for Exeunt magazine. She is a current member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Drama Desk, and the Outer Critics Circle.

She was a co-host and co-producer of the Maxamoo theater podcast. She was a Fellow at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center's National Critics Institute in 2015.

She has written about travel and world adventures for Shermans Travel and Frommers.com.

She has a B.F.A. in Film and Television from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. She has a J.D. from Fordham University. She is a former film executive and producer. She once had a prize-winning cow.