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Nicole Serratore

Arts, Culture, and Travel Journalism

NEW YORK, NY

Nicole Serratore

I write about US and UK theater and my travels to and fro.

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James Comey and the Predator in Chief

As I listened to James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, tell the Senate Intelligence Committee about his personal meetings and phone calls with President Trump, I was reminded of something: the experience of a woman being harassed by her powerful, predatory boss. There was precisely that sinister air of coercion, of an employee helpless to avoid unsavory contact with an employer who is trying to grab what he wants.
The New York Times Link to Story
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That’s What They Wrote and ‘That’swhatshesaid’

In That’swhatshesaid, the 72 pages of Matthew Lopez’s play The Whipping Man flip by—literally. As this happens, performer Erin Pike runs around the stage searching for her place. There are no female characters in The Whipping Man, so she finds no place, which is the point the artists staging it are trying to make—not about Lopez’s play, which they have no issue with per se, but as a representative of the dearth of female voices onstage in general.
American Theatre magazine Link to Story
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Join the Herd in “Counting Sheep,” an Immersive Folk Opera Embroiled in the 2014 Ukrainian Protests

These days, revolutions and upheavals are broadcasted, hashtagged, live-tweeted. In Counting Sheep, the resistance is all these things — and, also, immersive. Drawing on live video, documentary footage, and the audience’s participation in the action, the show re-creates the scene of the Ukrainian protests in Kiev’s Independence Square from 2014, putting the spectators right at the front lines of the barricades.
The Village Voice Link to Story
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Review: A Short Series of Disagreements Presented Here in Chronological Order

Daniel Kitson made his Washington, D.C. debut at the Studio Theatre with a new storytelling show called A Short Series of Disagreements Presented Here in Chronological Order (or ASSODPHICO). Except that’s not the show he’s doing. He opens with an extended introduction explaining to this audience that he was invited to do his previous story, Mouse, but he decided to write something new for the current political climate.
ExeuntNYC Link to Story
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Review: The Band’s Visit at Barrymore Theatre

The Band’s Visit proposes that no matter where you are in the world people are more alike than different. Overworked wives are irritated by unemployed husbands. Men desire women even if they are bad at articulating it. Loss and sadness can be carried for years. Jealousy, lust, longing, and romance cross boundaries, cultures, religions, and language.
Exeunt magazine Link to Story
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Review: M. Butterfly at Cort Theatre

David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly carefully juxtaposes politics and gender as he shifts our point of view on narrative, voice, and power in this still vibrant and remarkable play. With a revised plot for this Broadway revival, the production by director Julie Taymor unfortunately leans towards flatness and simplicity which dulls the power of the play and muddies the play’s intentions.
Exeunt magazine Link to Story
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Review: The Last Match at Laura Pels Theatre

Anna Ziegler’s play The Last Match gives us a front row seat to the psychological warfare between two tennis stars in the semifinals of the US Open. But fighting with each other on the court is only one layer of the conflict as they mine their own fears of failure, temptations with success, and deep seated need to win.
Exeunt magazine Link to Story
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Review: {my lingerie play} at Rattlestick Theater

Theater that comes with a do-it-yourself glitter station worries me. I’m a radical introvert. Can I wear my glitter on the inside? For Diana Oh’s {my lingerie play} 2017: THE CONCERT AND CALL TO ARMS!!!!!!!!! The Final Installation you most certainly can. Bring an open-heart and mind and the rewards will flow.
Exeunt magazine Link to Story
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Do Your Worst

Boom Bat Gesture's 'Do Your Worst' series asks artists to create deliberate flops. Nicole Serratore asks them about failure, DIY theatre, and Spiderman. “That was the living breathing example of you’re given literally the most resources and it’s the worst. It’s so bad.”. In a conversation about bad theater with Jon Burklund and Niko Tsocanos, two members of the performance ensemble Boom Bat Gesture, it was only a matter of time before someone mentioned Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.
Exeunt magazine Link to Story
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Time and the Conways review at American Airlines Theatre, New York – ‘moving performances’

JB Priestley’s between-the-wars drama, Time and the Conways bears the hallmarks of a well-made play of the period. It’s suffused with class conflict and familial strife. But this is one of Priestley’s ‘time plays’ and halfway through he upends expectations with metaphysical questions about dreams, memory and the nature of time.
The Stage (UK) Link to Story
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As You Like It review at Classic Stage Company, New York – ‘mild-mannered’

John Doyle’s Off-Broadway production of Shakespeare’s As You Like It is a mild-mannered affair – a passable production of limited enchantments. It’s energised by jazzy songs by Broadway composer Stephen Schwartz, but otherwise it favours understatement and fails to capture the play’s joy. Given the full-skirted costumes and accents, the production appears set in the late 1940s in the American South.
The Stage (UK) Link to Story
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The Riveting, Roving “Oh My Sweet Land” Tackles the Plight of the Refugee

The writer and director Amir Nizar Zuabi’s play Oh My Sweet Land has no fixed address. Instead of being housed in a theater, it is being performed every night in the kitchen of a different New York apartment or community space. This movement around the city mirrors the plight of Syrian refugees, the subject of the piece, who have been pushed out of their homes by war and forced into a nomadic existence.
The Village Voice Link to Story

About

Nicole Serratore

Nicole Serratore is a New York City-based freelance journalist.

She has written opinion pieces, reviews, and features for the New York Times, American Theatre magazine, The Stage (UK), the Village Voice, Exeunt magazine, TDF Stages, Flavorpill, and The Craptacular. She is the Broadway editor at Exeunt magazine. She is a current member of the American Theatre Critics Association.

She was a co-host and co-producer of the Maxamoo theater podcast. She was a Fellow at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center's National Critics Institute in 2015.

She has written about travel and world adventures for Shermans Travel and Frommers.com.

She has a B.F.A. in Film and Television from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. She has a J.D. from Fordham University. She is a former film executive and producer. She once had a prize-winning cow.